Instant Hot Water From Your Standard Water Heater!

Temperature controlled hot water recirculation valves draw hot water from your tank type water heater and replaces the cooled off hot water in your hot water pipes with hot water by sending the cooled water back to the water heater through your existing cold water line where it is reheated for use again.

Think of it this way, when you usually let the cooled off hot water run down the drain until hot water arrives at your faucet, the cooled off water in your hot water pipes has now been replaced with hot water. With the hot water recirculation valve, the cooled off water is simply sent back to the water heater (through your existing plumbing’s cold water line) while it is being replaced with fresh hot water. The result is hot water with very little wait time, usually within 6-seconds.

Install a temperature controlled hot water recirculation valve, which provides instant hot water (so water is not wasted down the drain waiting for water to run hot at your faucet or shower). The Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve is a simple eco-friendly DIY installation (no water pump required) and can save an average household up to 17,000 gallons per year. It also saves energy costs and can prevent pipe freezing.

Prevent Your Pipes From Freezing

The best solution to preventing your pipes from freezing is to simply install innovative and patented technology known as a “temperature controlled hot water recirculating valve” (is a breeze-no pipe cutting, soldering or electrical connections). It uses your existing water pipes and the thermal convection generated by your water heater to circulate the water back to your water heater for reheating (not requiring a pump or any electricity). These systems are temperature-controlled and are easily adjustable to meet your particular temperature needs. There is no water waste and it also reduces the energy required to heat your water while it provides instant hot water to your faucets and showers. A trickle of water circulating in your pipes will keep your pipes from freezing in most circumstances.

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Benefits of Hot Water Recirculation Systems

The best solution to preventing your pipes from freezing is to simply install innovative and patented technology known as a “temperature controlled hot water recirculating valve” (is a breeze-no pipe cutting, soldering or electrical connections). It uses your existing water pipes and the thermal convection generated by your water heater to circulate the water back to your water heater for reheating (not requiring a pump or any electricity). These systems are temperature-controlled and are easily adjustable to meet your particular temperature needs. There is no water waste and it also reduces the energy required to heat your water while it provides instant hot water to your faucets and showers. A trickle of water circulating in your pipes will keep your pipes from freezing in most circumstances.

The benefits of hot water recirculation systems are rather obvious. You get faster hot water, nearly instant hot water, which is convenient, and you save a substantial amount of water. But there are a few other issues to consider.

There are a number of types of recirculation systems for residential plumbing. There are the traditional full-time circulating systems that continuously pump a small flow of hot water through the piping from the heater to the fixtures and back to the inlet of the heater. Besides being quite difficult to install (requiring and electrical outlet under your sink), these full-time hot water recirculation pumps are very wasteful of energy. Your water heater will have to work much harder to supply the heat needed to replace the heat being radiated from the piping system. In years past when energy was cheap and plentiful these systems were very popular, however, in today’s energy conscious environment they are becoming rare in residential plumbing systems.

There are ways to reduce the energy loss such as using a demand button or putting the pump on a timer to reduce the number of hours it runs. The drawback to this is that if you want hot water at a different sink or the system is between cycles, you will still have a long wait and run a lot of water down the drain to get hot water. Several manufacturers like RedyTemp, Grundfos, Laing, Metlund, Taco, Chilipepper, and Watts offer these type systems.

Temperature Controlled Thermal Convection Powered Instant Hot Water Valves SAVE WATER and SAVE ENERGY! This is the most energy efficient type of recirculating system. It only operates when needed and is a simple DIY installation (no water pump or electrical connections required). Only one manufacturer offers this patented eco- friendly technology: The Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve.

Install a temperature controlled hot water recirculation valve, which provides instant hot water (so water is not wasted down the drain waiting for water to run hot at your faucet or shower). This simple DIY installation (no water pump required) can save an average household up to 17,000 gallons per year. It also saves energy costs and can prevent pipe freezing.

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What Are Hot Water Recirculating Loops?

Many people wait for hot water each morning. A similar thing happens when people operate other sinks, dishwashers and washing machines. Fortunately, this problem can be solved one of two ways depending upon how your plumbing system is designed. Keep in mind that the work to achieve your goal is not something the average do-it-yourselfer can tackle.

Clean water is a valuable natural resource and it should not be wasted. The trouble is, in many localities, water is a very cheap commodity. When prices are low, people tend to waste.

To get instant hot water as you often find at hotels and other institutions, you need to have a dedicated loop in the piping system that circulates hot water back to the water heater. Most houses do not have a dedicated loop as the hot water pipe typically dead ends at the plumbing fixture that is farthest away from the heater. It is possible to install an effective return loop in single story houses that have a basement or crawl space where the water supply pipes are visible below the floor joists. Two story houses make this task nearly impossible, as the piping system is typically hidden in the walls of the home.

But, you don’t have to install a dedicated return loop to you plumbing if you choose to use a modern hot water recirculating system. These products employ a nifty temperature adjustable by-pass valve that connects the cold and hot water supply lines at the fixture that is farthest away from the water heater. The bypass valve uses the cold water line as the return loop back to the water heater for faster hot water.

Not all recirculating systems are the same. One system places the pump under the sink at the farthest fixture. You have to push a button to start the pump. The trouble with this system is that you still have to wait for hot water. What’s more, this pump needs high voltage electric to operate. It can be a huge challenge to install an outlet under a sink.

Another system runs a remote pump at set times. The trouble with this system is that you will only get instant hot water during set times and you still need to install an electrical outlet for power.

Perhaps the best hot water recirculating system is one that is thermal convection powered (eco-friendly). The eco-friendly Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve has a temperature controlled by-pass valve under the farthest fixture sink and required no electricity to operate (which makes DIY installation easy and fast, not requiring a water pump). There is no water waste with this type of system, and it also minimizes energy waste since it only recirculates water when the hot water at your faucet cools below your desired temperature. This circulation of water can also prevent pipe freezing.

Install a temperature controlled Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve, which provides instant hot water (so water is not wasted down the drain waiting for water to run hot at your faucet or shower). This simple eco friendly DIY installation (no water pump required) can save an average household up to 17,000 gallons per year. It also saves energy costs and can prevent pipe freezing.

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It’s Easy to Stop Wasting Water!

Each year, thousands of gallons of wasted water go down the drain in American homes, and with them, thousands of dollars for homeowners, utility companies, and taxpayers.

A significant amount of this waste occurs when homeowners wait for their water to reach a comfortable temperature before they shower or wash their hands. Why do homeowners have to wait for hot water? In a traditional hot water system, water runs from the water heater to each faucet in the home but ends at the farthest faucet, leaving some water in the pipes to cool. When a homeowner turns on a faucet, the cooled water sitting in the pipes circulates to the faucet first, so the homeowner has to wait for the water to run hot.

There’s a simple and inexpensive way to eliminate the wait for hot water that will delight your customers and help conserve water. By installing hot water circulation systems for your customers, they can have instant hot water at the faucet. A hot water circulation system sends cooled water back to your water heater through your existing plumbing (your cold water line can be used as a return line), and circulates this water through the water heater as needed to keep it hot. This loop of water back through your water heater ensures that hot water is always available.

Good hot water circulation systems include these features:

  • An adjustable thermostat: to control the temperature in the return line by automatically opening and closing to keep the temperature of your water at your selected temperature.
  • An all brass valve for a long maintenance-free life.
  • No electrical connections (no water pump required) for an easy, danger-free installation.
  • Install an eco-friendly temperature controlled hot water recirculation valve, which provides instant hot water (so water is not wasted down the drain waiting for water to run hot at your faucet or shower). The eco-friendly Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve is a simple DIY installation (no water pump required) and can save an average household up to 17,000 gallons per year. It also saves energy costs and can prevent pipe freezing with faster hot water.
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America’s Water Shortage Evaluated

Water is in short supply for many cities, farms and businesses, and will remain so for the foreseeable future. To help promote water saving technology, many major cities are offering substantial rebates!

Drought conditions and environmental problems are reducing water deliveries to key regions of California. These regions will continue to see shortages even when normal rainfall returns.

Jobs are being lost in the hardest-hit areas, and growers are leaving thousands of acres unplanted and cutting back production of avocadoes, tomatoes, melons and other crops.

Population continues to grow, for example 60 million Californians now expected by 2050.

Climate change is ushering in new uncertainties for our water system, and longer periods of drought are likely in the coming decades.

These challenges mean we can no longer take a reliable water supply for granted. State and local water managers are working now on long-term solutions, but in the meantime, there is an immediate need for Americans to reduce their water use.

Conservation is one of the key strategies of a comprehensive solution to water challenges – and it’s something we can all do today.

For Example: Installing a hot water recirculation valve, which provides instant hot water to your plumbing system (so water is not wasted down the drain waiting for water to run hot at your faucet or shower). The “Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve” is a simple DIY installation (no water pump required) and can save an average household up to 17,000 gallons per year. It also saves energy costs and can prevent pipe freezing.

Install a temperature controlled Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve, which provides faster hot water (so water is not wasted down the drain waiting for water to run hot at your faucet or shower). This simple eco-friendly DIY installation (no water pump required) is patented and the only hot water recirculation system that provides the user with complete control of the operational water temperature and how often the water cycles back to you water heater for reheating.

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WATER AND ENERGY CONSERVATION SIMPLIFIED

Water conservation is the most cost-effective and environmentally sound way to reduce our demand for water. This stretches our supplies farther, and protects our precious oceans, lakes and rivers. For example, the city of Los Angeles has grown by 1 million people since the 1970s, but still uses the same amount of water. Using less water also puts less pressure on our sewage treatment facilities, and uses less energy for water heating.

Saving water also saves energy. 6.5% of the energy used in the state of California is for pumping and treating water–in fact, pumping water accounts for 2-3% of all the electricity used in most states. And for your personal energy bill, using less hot water saves on water heating. On the flip side, saving energy and using alternative energy saves water–electricity production from fossil fuels and nuclear energy is responsible for 39% of all freshwater withdrawals in the nation.

One of the most cost effective ways to conserve water in to install a temperature controlled hot water recirculation valve, which provides instant hot water to your plumbing (so water is not wasted down the drain waiting for water to run hot at your faucet or shower). The Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve is a simple eco-friendly DIY installation (no water pump required) can save an average household up to 17,000 gallons per year. It also saves energy costs by reheating warm water instead of ground temperature water.

Install a temperature controlled hot water recirculation valve, which provides instant hot water (so water is not wasted down the drain waiting for water to run hot at your faucet or shower). This simple DIY installation (no water pump required) provides faster hot water which can save an average household up to 17,000 gallons per year. It also saves energy costs and can prevent pipe freezing.

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Water Saving Products With the Best Return

(not listed in any particular order)

  • Washer-less Faucets: Replacing your “old style” rubber washer sealed valve with a washer-less type valve means never having to change a leaky rubber washer again.
  • Sensor Faucets: Replacing your manually operated faucets with an infra-red no-touch sensor type faucet, insures water will only flow when the faucet in use.
  • Waterless Urinals: Replacing water-flush urinals with a waterless urinal that use liquid sealant lighter than water and uses gravity to wash urine over the trap and down the drain rather than water can save thousands of gallon of water each month.
  • Hot Water Recirculation Valves: Installing an eco-friendly Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve, which provides instant hot water (so water is not wasted down the drain waiting for water to run hot at your faucet or shower). This simple DIY installation (no water pump required) can save an average household up to 17,000 gallons per year. Faster hot water also saves energy costs and can prevent pipe freezing.
  • Electronic Leak Detection: Installing leak detection and monitoring systems throughout the plumbing system can continuously monitor leaks and water usage to evaluate ways to economize water usage.
  • Temperature Activated Shower Nozzles: Installing temperature activated shower nozzle technology will slow the water flow to a trickle when your away from the shower and the water temperature reaches a comfortable 95 degrees. Now, your hot water isn’t running down the drain while you’re away from the shower.
  • Install a temperature controlled hot water recirculation valve, which provides instant hot water (so water is not wasted down the drain waiting for water to run hot at your faucet or shower). The Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve is a simple DIY plumbing installation (no water pump required) and can save an average household up to 17,000 gallons per year. It also saves energy costs and can prevent pipe freezing.
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Basic Water Conservation 101

Water conservation refers to reducing the usage of water and recycling of waste water for different purposes such as cleaning, manufacturing, and agricultural irrigation.

According to Wikipedia: Water conservation can be defined as: Any beneficial reduction in water loss, use or waste as well as the preservation of water quality. A reduction in water use accomplished by implementation of water conservation or water efficiency measures; or, Improved water management practices that reduce or enhance the beneficial use of water. A water conservation measure is an action, behavioral change, device, technology, or improved design or process implemented to reduce water loss, waste, or use. Water efficiency is a tool of water conservation. That results in more efficient water use and thus reduces water demand. The value and cost-effectiveness of a water efficiency measure must be evaluated in relation to its effects on the use and cost of other natural resources (e.g. energy or chemicals).

The goals of water conservation efforts include as follows:

  • Sustainability. To ensure availability for future generations, the withdrawal of fresh water from an ecosystem should not exceed its natural replacement rate.
  • Energy conservation. Water pumping, delivery, and wastewater treatment facilities consume a significant amount of energy. In some regions of the world (for example, California) over 15% of total electricity consumption is devoted to water management.
  • Habitat conservation. Minimizing human water use helps to preserve fresh water habitats for local wildlife and migrating waterfowl, as well as reducing the need to build new dams and other water diversion infrastructure.

Water conservation programs are typically initiated at the local level, by either municipal water utilities or regional governments. Common strategies include public rebate campaigns, tiered water rates (charging progressively higher prices as water use increases), or restrictions on outdoor water use such as lawn watering and car washing. Cities in dry climates often require or encourage the installation of xeriscaping or natural landscaping in new homes to reduce outdoor water usage.

One fundamental conservation goal is universal metering. The prevalence of residential water metering varies significantly worldwide. Recent studies have estimated that water supplies are metered in less than 30% of households, and about 61% of urban homes (as of 2001) Although individual water meters have often been considered impractical in homes with private wells or in multifamily buildings, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that metering alone can reduce consumption by 20 to 40 percent. In addition to raising consumer awareness of their water use, metering is also an important way to identify and localize water leaks.

Some researchers have suggested that water conservation efforts should be primarily directed at farmers, in light of the fact that crop irrigation accounts for 70% of the world’s fresh water use. The agricultural sector of most countries is important both economically and politically, and water subsidies are common. Conservation advocates have urged removal of all subsidies to force farmers to grow more water-efficient crops and adopt less wasteful irrigation techniques.

Water-saving technology for the home includes:

  • Temperature controlled hot water recirculation valve, which provides instant hot water (so water is not wasted down the drain waiting for water to run hot at your faucet or shower). This simple DIY installation (no water pump required) can save an average household up to 17,000 gallons per year. It also saves energy costs and can prevent pipe freezing with faster hot water.
  • Low-flow shower heads sometimes called energy-efficient shower heads as they also use less energy, Low-flush toilets and composting toilets. These have a dramatic impact in the developed world, as conventional Western toilets use large volumes of water.
  • Dual flush toilets includes two buttons or handles to flush different levels of water. Dual flush toilets use up to 67% less water than conventional toilets.
  • Saline water (sea water) or rain water can be used for flushing toilets.
  • Faucet aerators, which break water flow into fine droplets to maintain “wetting effectiveness” while using less water. An additional benefit is that they reduce splashing while washing hands and dishes.
  • Wastewater reuse or recycling systems, allowing the reuse of graywater for flushing toilets or watering gardens, and recycling of wastewater through purification at a water treatment plant.
  • High-efficiency clothes washers.
  • Weather-based irrigation controllers.
  • Garden hose nozzles that shut off water when it is not being used, instead of letting a hose run.
  • Using low-flow taps in wash basins.
  • Automatic faucets-a water conservation faucet that eliminates water waste at the faucet. It automates the use of faucets without the using of hands.
  • Water can also be conserved by landscaping with native plants and by changing behavior, such as shortening showers and not running the faucet while brushing teeth.
  • Installing an eco-friendly temperature controlled hot water recirculation valve to your plumbing, which provides instant hot water (so water is not wasted down the drain waiting for water to run hot at your faucet or shower). The Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve is a simple eco-friendly DIY installation (no water pump required) can save an average household up to 17,000 gallons per year. It also saves energy costs and can prevent pipe freezing.
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Where Do We Waste The Most Water?

Bathroom use accounts for about 75 percent of the water used inside the home.

  • Check regularly for any leaks in your toilet, faucets and water hose bibs and fix them. Water saved: up to 200 gallons per day.
  • Install a low-flow showerhead. Water saved: about 2 gallons per minute.
  • Replace older, larger-use toilets with the newer higher efficiency toilets. Water saved: .5 to 5 gallons per flush.
  • Take short showers and save the baths for special occasions. Water saved: 2 to 5 gallons per minute.
  • Install a temperature controlled hot water recirculation valve, which provides instant hot water (so water is not wasted down the drain waiting for water to run hot at your faucet or shower). This simple eco-friendly DIY (no water pump required) installation can save an average household up to 17,000 gallons per year. It also helps prevent pipe freezing with faster hot water and saves energy costs by reheating warm water instead of ground temperature water.

About 8 percent of in-home water use takes place in the kitchen.

  • Don’t rinse dishes before loading dishwasher. Water saved: 20 gallons per load.
  • Wash only full loads in the dishwasher. An efficient dishwasher usually uses much less water than washing dishes by hand.
  • Install a low-flow faucet aerator, which can cut water use in half. Water saved: 1 to 2 gallons per minute.
  • When buying a new dishwasher, consider purchasing a water-saving model. (New models use up to 25 percent less water than older ones.) Water saved: 3 gallons per load.

Water use around the rest of the house makes up the remaining 17 percent of water use:

  • Wash only full loads in the clothes washer. Washing small loads uses over twice as much water per pound of laundry.
  • When buying a new clothes washer, consider purchasing a water-saving model. Water saved: up to 40 gallons per load.
  • Insulate hot water pipes where possible to avoid long delays (and wasted water) while waiting for the water to “run hot.” When building a new home, keep the distance short between the hot water heater and showers and other places that hot water is used.
  • Manage your irrigation systems.
  • Remember to fix all leaks promptly.
  • Install a temperature controlled hot water recirculation valve to your plumbing, which provides instant hot water (so water is not wasted down the drain waiting for water to run hot at your faucet or shower). The eco-friendly Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot Water Valve is a simple DIY installation (no water pump required) and can save an average household up to 17,000 gallons per year. It also saves energy costs and aids in preventing pipe freeze with faster hot water.
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Easy Ways to Make Your Home More Energy Efficient

Your house is an eco system. You save money and improve performance when you take cost-effective measures that reduce energy use, and install systems and appliances that are the right size to meet your needs. In general, the wrong size systems and use more energy and increase operating costs.

The most effective strategy for improving household energy efficiency is to first target your home’s envelope—walls, attic, windows, and doors. Then improve the energy efficiency of systems, such as heating, cooling, lighting, and appliances. Finally, consider clean energy generation (solar, geothermal, and so on).

1. Make sure your walls and attic are well insulated. Effective insulation slows the rate that heat flows out of the house in winter or into the house in summer, so less energy is required to heat or cool the house. If your house has no wall insulation, and it has more-or-less continuous wall cavities (such as conventional stud walls), blown-in insulation can greatly improve your comfort and save enough energy to be very cost-effective. (It rarely pays to blow additional insulation into already insulated walls.) If your attic is unfinished, it often pays to upgrade its insulation.

Your contractor’s expertise is more important than the insulation material you choose. Properly installed fiberglass, cellulose, and most foam insulation materials can all reduce the heat conduction of the completed wall system. The key is “properly installed.” Ideally, the contractor will use an infrared camera during or after installation to look for voids.

2. Upgrade or replace windows. If your windows are old and leaky, it may be time to replace them with energy-efficient models or boost their efficiency with weatherstripping and storm windows. It is almost never cost-effective to replace windows just to save energy. According to EnergyStar.gov, replacing windows will save 7 to 24 percent of your heating and air-conditioning bills, but the larger savings would be associated with replacing single-glazed windows. However, if you are replacing windows for other reasons anyway, in many areas the additional cost of Energy Star–rated replacement windows is very modest, perhaps $15 per window. This upgrade would be cost-effective—and increase your comfort to boot.

3. Plant shade trees and shrubs around your house. If your house is older, with relatively poor insulation and windows, good landscaping (particularly deciduous trees) can save energy, especially if planted on the house’s west side. In summer, the foliage blocks infrared radiation that would warm the house, while in winter the bare branches let this radiation come through. Of course, if your house has very good insulation and Energy Star or better windows, the effect is much, much smaller because the building shell itself is already blocking almost all the heat gain.

4. Replace an older furnace with a high-efficiency system. If your furnace was built before 1992 and has a standing pilot, it probably wastes 35 percent of the fuel it uses, and it is probably near the end of its service life. In this case, in all but the warmest climates, ACEEE recommends early replacement with a condensing furnace with annual efficiency of at least 90 percent. This type of furnace wastes no more than 10 percent of the natural gas you buy, and may save you as much as 27 percent on your heating bill.

If your furnace was installed after 1991, it probably has an annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE) rating of 80 percent, so the savings from replacement is smaller, but would be at least 11 percent if the unit is working perfectly. Your heating service technician or energy auditor may be able to help you determine the AFUE of your present system.

For houses with boilers and hot-water heat distribution (radiators, baseboard), the savings from a modern condensing boiler with outdoor reset or equivalent feedback controls can be substantially larger, since the condensing boilers allow reducing the circulating loop temperature almost all the time.

5. Improve the efficiency of your hot water system. First, turn down the temperature of your water heater to the warm setting (120°F). Second, insulate your hot water lines so they don’t cool off as quickly between uses. Third, use low-flow fixtures for showers and baths. While storage water heater standards were raised in 2001, it was probably not enough to justify throwing out an existing water heater that is working well.

Savvy consumers are now installing eco-friendly hot water recirculation valves, which provide instant hot water to your plumbing (so water is not wasted down the drain waiting for water to run hot at your faucet or shower). The Hot Water Lobster Instant Hot water Valve is a simple DIY installation (no water pump required) which can save an average household up to 17,000 gallons per year. While providing faster hat water to all you fixtures, it also saves energy costs and can prevent pipe freezing.

6. Replace incandescent lightbulbs with compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) or LEDs.

CFLs can save three-quarters of the electricity used by incandescents. Most people don’t think about the fact that the electricity to run a lightbulb costs much more than the bulb itself. One of the new CFLs costs about two or three dollars, but it lasts 10,000 hours and uses only about 27 watts to generate as much light as a 100-watt incandescent bulb. During its life, it uses about $22 in electricity, so the total cost is about $25. A 100-watt incandescent bulb costs 50 cents, but lasts 1,000 hours so you need 10 of them ($5 to buy) to last 10,000 hours. In those 10,000 hours you will use 1,000 kilowatts of electricity, which will cost more than $80 at a national average price. So the lighting cost of the CFL is less than one-third of the cost for the incandescent. The best targets for replacement are 60- to 100-watt bulbs used several hours a day, because usage affects how long it takes to recover the investment.

7. If you buy a new refrigerator, don’t leave the old one plugged in. Avoid the temptation to use the old fridge as a backup for party supplies and liquid refreshment. The extra storage space will cost you: figure an extra $50–150 per year in electricity to keep that older fridge running. In contrast, the new fridge, particularly if Energy Star rated, may cost only $30–60 per year to run because refrigerator efficiency has improved so much in the past three decades. Under these circumstances, think about how much refrigeration you really need. The best rule is to have only one refrigerator, and to size it to meet your real needs. That allows the luxury of ice-makers and similar conveniences with a clear conscience.

Also consider configuration. A similarly sized refrigerator with a top-mount freezer will use 20 to 25 percent less energy than a side-by-side model and often offers more usable refrigerator and freezer space.

8. Take advantage of new tax incentives to improve your home. Federal tax incentives are available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Energy efficiency incentives for upgrades to existing homes have been extended, and are now available for 2009 and 2010. These incentives now cover up to $1,500 (from $500), based on 30 percent of the cost of the improvement. Improvements can include building-envelope improvements (windows, insulation) and heating/air-conditioning upgrades. There are also 30-percent credits, without a cap, for on-site renewables (solar photovoltaic and solar hot-water systems, small wind systems, and geothermal heat pumps).

9. Schedule an energy audit for more expert advice on your home as a whole.

Energy auditors and raters use specialized tools and skills to evaluate your home and recommend the most cost-effective measures to improve its comfort and efficiency, as well as the best sequence for doing them to take advantage of interactions. The rater can also provide independent verification of contractors’ work quality. Look for raters who are RESNET Accredited. In some regions, there are Home Performance with Energy Star programs, too. Most of these programs include low-cost home assessment and strong quality assurance practices and/or inspections.

10. Install a temperature controlled hot water recirculation valve, which provides instant hot water (so water is not wasted down the drain waiting for water to run hot at your faucet or shower). This simple eco friendly DIY installation (no water pump required) can save an average household up to 17,000 gallons per year. It also saves energy costs.

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